Our Kids

Our kids are not defined by their homelesness.

Our kids find and maintain employment.
After being rejected by employer after employer for her nonexistent work history and poor literacy skills, Kimia began working at the airport and has held her job for more than six months.

Our kids go to college.
Leonard studied every night to earn his GED while working full-time and living in our apartment program. He began college and finished his first year with a 3.87 GPA.

Our kids move into their own apartments.
Carey lived in our Rights of Passage program for a year and saved every cent he could. He moved into his own apartment with $5200 in the bank.

Our kids reunify with their families.
Jackson's mother couldn't handle him any longer, kicking him out of the house until he stops selling drugs and begins school. We helped him to do both and provided them with family counseling.

Our kids step up to their parenting responsibilities.
Crystal moved into our mothers and babies program, delivered her daughter and learned how to be a good mom. She's now gained custody of her 14-year-old sister and is raising her as well.

Our kids stop using drugs.
Smart, athletic and charming, Darnell convinced himself and everyone else he did not have a drug problem, until he lost job after job. He attended our drug treatment program and stopped using drugs to numb his pain for the first time in five years.

Read the courageous stories of a few of our kids


COVENANT HOUSE NEW JERSEY BY THE NUMBERS:

AFTER THEY WALKED THROUGH OUR DOORS LAST YEAR…
1,010 youth were served in residence
44,895 nights of shelter were provided
167,535 meals were served
101 youth advanced their education
28 babies were born into a loving home
2,841 youth were served by outreach
962 medical visits were offered
199 youth obtained employment
182 youth moved to independence
125 youth lived with us each night

BEFORE THEY WALKED THROUGH OUR DOORS LAST YEAR…
47% had been in foster care
44% reported physical abuse as children
35% reported sexual abuse as children
33% had been hospitalized because of mental illness
89% were unemployed
51% hadn't graduated high school
19% were enrolled in school
35% required treatment for a chronic medical condition
81% had lost someone in their immediate family to death
12% had lost someone close to them to murder